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HomeTrainingOnline training in psychological health and safety

Online training in psychological health and safety

Being a Mindful Employee: An Orientation to Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace

From the MHCC, “Being a Mindful Employee: An Orientation to Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace” is a free online training program for employees. The goal is to help employees understand the 13 psychosocial workplace factors from the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace. More importantly, the program demonstrates what can impact employee mental health and what we can all do to support ourselves and others in the workplace.

Register now for the free online training.

Download customizable posters now as a visual resource to reinforce the key learnings from this training program.

Assembling the Pieces Toolkit

This free online toolkit is designed to support organizations working to implement the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (the Standard). As a companion to the “Assembling the Pieces Implementation Guide” and the Standard, this toolkit provides practical advice for implementing key elements of the Standard, as well as links to customizable tools that will assist organizations in taking action.

Recommended for employers, senior leaders, human resource managers, and occupational health and safety professionals.

Get started now!

These two courses are being hosted on the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) website, making them easily accessible for everyone across Canada.

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