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A Practical Toolkit to Help Employers Build an Inclusive Workforce

A Practical Toolkit to Help Employers Build an Inclusive Workforce is meant to help human resources (HR) professionals and those with HR, wellness and diversity responsibilities increase accessibility and inclusiveness and address the needs of workers living with mental illness.

Because recruitment, retention, and support policies and practices affect everyone, the toolkit draws on the insights of workers with experience of mental illness as well as their co-workers and managers.

The toolkit is divided into five sections that outline the steps and strategies organizations can implement to better recruit, hire, and retain workers living with mental illness. The toolkit includes:

  • An organizational self-assessment to reflect on current practices and set priorities for improvement
  • Identification of priorities for action
  • Proposed strategies for low-cost action
  • A framework to assess the return on investment

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